Bonsais are “ordinary” trees that are kept small by means of special techniques and care. Indoor or inside bonsais are tropical or subtropical species. Anyone who keeps these species must bear this in mind when caring for them.

General rule for care
Light, humidity, warmth, water and food in the correct quantities are essential.







Bonsais are “ordinary” trees that are kept small by means of special techniques and care. Indoor or inside bonsais are tropical or subtropical species. Anyone who keeps these species must bear this in mind when caring for them.

General rule for care
Light, humidity, warmth, water and food in the correct quantities are essential.






Location
Place the bonsai in the lightest possible location, but not (constantly) in full sunshine behind glass, or above a central heating radiator – where the temperatures rise very quickly!












Temperature
Never allow the temperature to fall below 15°C or rise above 30°C.













Light
A bonsai can never have enough light. This does not mean that all bonsais can withstand direct sunlight – and certainly not behind a south-facing window. A location 1 to 2 metres from the window, facing south, is best.













Humidity
Most (centrally heated) rooms in a house are generally too dry for a bonsai. A good method is to place the bonsai on a large under-dish filled with Agrex granules and then to fill this with water. This creates a micro-climate around the bonsai. Make sure that the water does not reach the rim of the pot!














Water
The higher the temperature, the more water the bonsai needs. This is because water evaporates from the leaves and soil. The soil must always feel damp, but the bonsai should not be left in standing water, as this causes root rot to occur. A bonsai is not a marsh plant. The best method of adding water is to immerse the bonsai up to the rim of the pot in a small tub of water, then remove the pot and allow the water to drip off.













Food
Every living organism needs food. Bonsais therefore also need food. This can be bought in the form of (bonsai) fertiliser with low N, P and K values and enhanced with trace elements. Add the specified amounts about once every 2 weeks in spring and autumn, and once per month in autumn and winter.












Care
If the bonsai sprouts, i.e. if long spindly shoots form with large, much lighter, leaves and long internodes(large gaps between the leaves), the bonsai is not getting enough light. For compact growth with lots of fine branches, cut the twigs back to 2 leaves (but not before at least 6 leaves are present). Repot the bonsai every second year, removing one third of the roots at the same time. Do not forget to place the bonsai firmly in the pot. Use bonsai soil or Akadama (Japanese clay granulate) as potting compost.








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